Course Information

 

for _TBD Department


Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (BS 101)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to the history, religion, and literature of ancient Israel as found in the Hebrew Bible. It will draw attention to the diverse political, social, and economic situations out of which they arose, and to which they were addressed, within the context of Ancient Near Eastern culture and history. Attention will be given to the critical perspectives needed to understand Israel’s history and Old Testament literature. Exegetical methods will be introduced.

Introduction to the New Testament (BS 103)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the New Testament set within the context of the early church. It aims to provide students with basic knowledge about the New Testament, and the essential tools and techniques of exegesis and interpretation.

Elementary Hebrew I (BS 150A)

Credits:3

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of classical Hebrew.

Elementary Hebrew II (BS 150B)

Credits:3

Continuing early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of classical Hebrew.

Elementary Greek I (BS 160A)

Credits:3

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of Koine Greek.

Elemetary Greek II (BS 160B)

Credits:3

Continuing early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of Koine Greek.

Johannine Literature (BS 220)

Credits:3

A study of the Fourth Gospel and the First Letter of John. The purpose of the course is to lift up some key themes in the Johannine literature, and with the help of traditional historical critical and other new methods, engage the history and development of the Johannine community, as well as Johannine portrait of Jesus as the divine wisdom/word made flesh. The goal is to help students understand the Johannine Jesus and community, and their implications for addressing the experiences and needs of their own communities. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

The Eighth Century Prophets (BS 230)

Credits:3

This course will begin with early manifestations of prophecy in Israel as found primarily in the Deuteronomistic History (Samuel-Kings). It will then focus on the literature attributed to the eighth century prophets Amos, Hosea, Micah, and First Isaiah. These writings will be examined in their social context, and analyzed for their potential relevance for the Church and the modern world. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Cultural Hermeneutics (BS 270)

Credits:3

This course is an exploration of how the cultural backgrounds and perspectives of an interpreter influence his or her conclusions regarding New Testament materials. The ideology of traditional "Eurocentric" New Testament interpretations will be considered alongside the interpretations produced by Latin American, African American, African, Asian, Feminist, and Womanist scholars, preachers, theologians. The goal of this study is to help students to develop their own interpretive and theological voice. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Luke - Acts (BS 310)

Credits:3

This course will survey the history of Lukan interpretation, and focus on reading Luke-Acts as a narrative whole. Particular attention will be paid to Luke’s presentations of Jesus’ ministry, its theological and sociological implications, and how Acts functions as Luke’s expansion of the Gospel tradition into the life of the early church. Prerequisite: BS 101 or BS103

The Gospel of Matthew (BS 320)

Credits:3

This course will examine the variety of modern methods of biblical study, which have been employed in the evaluation of the meaning and significance of this gospel. Particular attention will be paid to the methods of social history. An exegesis of selected texts will be required. Prerequisite: BS 101 or BS103

Reading the Gospel of Mark (BS 321)

Credits:3

An exegetical analysis of Mark’s gospel. Specific attention will be given to the interpretation of miracle stories. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the various contemporary methods of reading the Gospel in the church. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

The Book of Job (BS 324)

Credits:3

An exegetical study of the Book of Job in its cultural, historical and literary setting, with attention to critical and hermeneutical problems. The course will also explore some of the book's main ideas (e.g., human suffering, recovery, the mystery of divine justice) as they relate to today's world. The course will also develop a critical evaluation of the religious and moral lessons from the book of Job. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Wisdom Literature and The Psalms (BS 328)

Credits:3

This course focuses on selected texts from each book of the wisdom literature in its historical context, the conditions that produced the book and shaped its thinking. The course also attempts to discern theological themes within the wisdom literature: Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Songs. The course will also explore selected texts from Psalms and their contexts, showing Israel at prayer and worship, and their application in the Church today. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

The Corinthian Correspondence (BS 355)

Credits:3

This course will review a variety of exegetical approaches and apply them, as appropriate, to the study of Corinthians. The student will gain knowledge in the exegesis of New Testament epistolary literature and its implication for addressing the issues of the church today. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

The Book of Revelation (BS 360)

Credits:3

This course intends to provide a close, exegetical reading of the Book of Revelation—its general framework within the social, literary, historical, political, and theological contexts. To make sense of this type of literature, we need to employ a critical analysis of the various historical, political, literary, religious or theological, and sociological contexts in which first century Christians were subjected. This course will also equip students with a theoretical and methodological framework for the relevant symbolic field of Apocalypticism, which is the religious belief in modes of eschatological happenings. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Directed Study (BS 370)

Credits:3

An opportunity for middler and senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue, or concern more fully. The student shall approach a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that will fulfill the agreed upon requirements for the conclusion of the study. Prerequisites: Faculty approval AND BS101 or BS103

Introduction to Hebrew Scriptures (BS 401)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the history, religion, and literature of ancient Israel as found in the Hebrew Bible. It draws attention to the diverse political, social, and economic situations out of which they arose, and to which they were addressed, within the context of Ancient Near Eastern culture and history. Attention is given to the critical perspectives needed to understand Israel’s history and Old Testament literature. Exegetical methods are introduced.

Introduction to the New Testament (BS 403)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the New Testament set within the context of the early church. It aims to provide students with basic knowledge about the New Testament, and the essential tools and techniques of exegesis and interpretation.

Elementary Hebrew I (BS 450A)

Credits:2

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of classical Hebrew.

Elementary Hebrew II (BS 450B)

Credits:2

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of classical Hebrew.

Elementary Greek I (BS 460A)

Credits:3

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of Koine Greek.

Elementary Greek II (BS 460B)

Credits:3

An early exposure to the reading of biblical texts is coupled with a systematic study of the grammar of Koine Greek.

Johannine Literature (BS 520)

Credits:3

A study of the Fourth Gospel and the First Letter of John. The purpose of the course is to lift key themes in Johannine literature, and with the help of traditional historical critical and other new methods, engage the history and development of the Johannine community, as well as Johannine portrait of Jesus as the divine wisdom/word made flesh. The goal is to help students understand the Johannine Jesus and community, and their implications for addressing the experiences and needs of their own communities.

The Eighth Century Prophets (BS 530)

Credits:3

This course begins with early manifestations of prophecy in Israel as found primarily in the Deuteronomistic History (Samuel-Kings). It then focuses on the literature attributed to the eighth century prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah, and First Isaiah. These writings are examined in their social context, and analyzed for their potential relevance for the Church and the modern world.

Cultural Hermeneutics (BS 570)

Credits:3

This course explores the cultural backgrounds and perspectives of interpreters and their conclusions regarding New Testament materials. The ideology of traditional “Eurocentric” New Testament interpretations are considered alongside that of Latin American, African American, African, Asian, Feminist and Womanist interpreters. The goal of this study is to help students to develop their own interpretive and theological voices.

Luke-Acts (BS 610)

Credits:3

This course surveys the history of Lukan interpretation, and focuses on reading Luke-Acts as a narrative whole. Particular attention is paid to Luke’s presentations of Jesus’ ministry, its theological and sociological implications, and how Acts functions as Luke’s expansion of the Gospel tradition into the life of the early church.

The Gospel of Matthew (BS 620)

Credits:3

This course examines the variety of modern methods of biblical study that have been employed in the evaluation of the meaning and significance of this gospel. Particular attention is paid to methods of social history. Exegesis of selected texts is required.

Reading the Gospel of Mark (BS 621)

Credits:3

An exegetical analysis of Mark’s gospel. Specific attention is given to the interpretation of miracle stories. Particular emphasis is placed upon the various contemporary methods of reading the Gospel in the church.

The Book of Job (BS 624)

Credits:3

An exegetical study of the Book of Job in its cultural, historical and literary setting, with attention to critical and hermeneutical problems. The course explores some of the book’s main ideas (e.g., human suffering, recovery, the mystery of divine justice) as they relate to today’s world. The course also develops a critical evaluation of the religious and moral lessons from the book of Job.

Wisdom Literature and the Psalms (BS 628)

Credits:3

This course focuses on selected texts from each book of the wisdom literature in its historical context, the conditions that produced the book and shaped its thinking. The course also attempts to discern theological themes within the wisdom literature: Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Songs. The course will also explore selected texts from Psalms and their contexts, showing Israel at prayer and worship, and their application in the Church today

The Corinthian Correspondence (BS 655)

Credits:3

This course reviews a variety of exegetical approaches and apply them, as appropriate, to the study of Corinthians. The student gains knowledge in the exegesis of New Testament epistolary literature and its implication for addressing the issues of the church today.

The Book of Revelation (BS 660)

Credits:3

This course intends to provide a close, exegetical reading of the Book of Revelation—its general framework within the social, literary, historical, political and theological contexts. To make sense of this type of literature, we need to employ a critical analysis of the various historical, political, literary, religious or theological and sociological contexts in which first century Christians were subjected. This course also equips students with a theoretical and methodological framework for the relevant symbolic field of Apocalypticism, which is the religious belief in modes of eschatological happenings.

Directed Studies (BS 670)

Credits:3

Prerequisites: Faculty approval. An opportunity for Middler and Senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue or concern more fully. The student approaches a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that fulfills the agreed-upon requirements for the conclusion of the study.

Biblical Studies: Special Topic (BS 699)

Credits:3

This course offers various topics in Biblical Studies. Each section will have a unique description for the specific class being offered.

Biblical Studies Elective (BS ELEC)

Credits:3

Using Scripture as a Basis for Muslim/Christian Dialogue (BS/CM 235)

Credits:3

This provocative course will explore the holy writings of Christianity and Islam as resources for interfaith encounter and dialogue. Beginning with an examination of our own interpretive lenses, students will move on to identify themes and texts in the Quran and Christian scripture that can be dialogical meeting places, practice reading strategies, and develop guidelines for conversation across the lines of faith. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Intro to Blended Theological Education (CM 090)

Credits:1

This course will introduce students to Payne's blended curriculum. Training includes residential Intensive courses, online systems - Blackboard, Sonisweb (SIS), student email account - Student Government SGA and Payne policies and procedures for matriculation. This class id Pass/Fail.

Theological Research & Writing I (CM 100A)

Credits:3

This course offers a detailed, hands-on overview of the academic writing process, focused on effective methods for locating authoritative sources on selected topics; summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting material from sources into student papers while avoiding plagiarism; appropriately acknowledge authorship of material from other sources; review of grammar to included the mechanics involved in academic writing; and in general, comforting to prevailing standards of acceptability for written work submitted for publication, presentation at academic meetings, or fulillment of course credit and graduation requirements.

Theological Research & Writing II (CM 100B)

Credits:3

Continuing a detailed, hands-on overview of the academic writing process, focused on effective methods for locating authoritative sources on selected topics; summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting material from sources into student papers while avoiding plagiarism; appropriately acknowledge authorship of material from other sources; review of grammar to include the mechanics involved in academic writing; and in general, comforting to prevailing standards of acceptability for written work submitted for publication, presentation at academic meetings, or fulfillment of course credit and graduation requirements.

Supervised Ministry I (CM 101A)

Credits:2

This experience is based on an action - reflection model. Students are placed in the ministry context to perform a ministry. A supervisory conversation occurs between the student and the supervisor in the ministry context at least once per week. The students meet for reflection and discussion. Students are required to bring critical incidents from their ministry experience for reflection during these sessions. Discussion of other topics related to practical ministry also occurs.

Supervised Ministry II (CM 101B)

Credits:2

This experience is based on an action - reflection model. Students are placed in the ministry context to perform a ministry. A supervisory conversation occurs between the student and the supervisor in the ministry context at least once per week. The students meet for reflection and discussion. Students are required to bring critical incidents from their ministry experience for reflection during these sessions. Discussion of other topics related to practical ministry also occurs.

Pulpit Communication I (CM 102)

Credits:3

Study of fundamental principles of sermon construction and delivery, involving practical demonstrations of these principles by each student. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

Methods & Strategies for Comm & Econ Dev (CM 104)

Credits:3

The course will present a church and ministry community and economic development models that highlight the “call” of the church to serve as a sacred space in which broken persons risk personal transformation and healing. The course will acknowledge church and ministry leaders who live out the role of the Gospel as a “developer” of diverse persons, not just those who attend church, but those who stand outside of the church. Participants will explore a five-point criteria that addresses the ethic, ecumenical, ecological, economical, and evangelical facets that should undergird transformational community and economic development models with a vision for individual and corporate empowerment.

Introduction to Theological Education (Intro. to Theology) (CM 105)

Credits:3

This course is designed to: 1) help students discover the interconnectedness of context, theology, language and the seminary curriculum with ministry that is faithful to the gospel; 2) introduce students to the tools of academic research and writing; and 3) help students develop research and writing skills by instructing them in methods of investigation and guidelines for writing research papers.

Integrative Theology and Human Development (CM 105A)

Credits:2

This course is designed to: 1) help students discover the interconnectedness of context, theology, language and the seminary curriculum with ministry that is faithful to the gospel; 2) introduce students to the tools of academic research and writing; and 3) help students develop research and writing skills by instructing them in methods of investigation and guidelines for writing research papers.

Marketplace Ministry (CM 130)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students explore the various ways in which pastors and church leaders can access multiple sources of capital to fuel church growth and community revitalization. Students will examine biblical and other paradigms, strategies and practical applications to address the many issues facing local congregations primarily from an African-American perspective.

Spiritual Formation (CM 150)

Credits:3

This course is designed to engage participants in an exploration and expansion of their inner spiritual life utilizing the spiritual disciplines. Personal transformation is an internal process that occurs as the individual allows God access to the whole of one’s being and life. This course is in conjunction with New Student Orientation at Payne Theological Seminary. Required of all new/entering students in the first year.

Ministry Formation I (CM 180)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students explore the various ways in which pastors and church leaders can access multiple sources of capital to fuel church growth and community revitalization. Students will examine biblical and other paradigms, strategies and practical applications to address the many issues facing local congregations primarily from an African-American perspective.

Supervised Ministry III (CM 201A)

Credits:2

This experience is based on the same model described above. The case-study method is employed during the reflection sessions.

Supervised Ministry IV (CM 201B)

Credits:2

Pulpit Communication II (CM 202)

Credits:3

The enhancement of preaching skills in a structured learning situation is the purpose of this course. The student will be aided in the development of a mature pulpit presence and style. May be used to fulfill CM233 requirement. Prerequisites: CM100A and CM102

Introduction to Christian Education (CM 210)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce the student to the Christian educational task of the Church. It includes an examination of the biblical, theological, and social foundations pertinent to the ministry of Christian Education. Discussions of topics such as the basic components of the Christian education program, methodologies and techniques for implementation, curriculum selection and development, as well as program evaluation will characterize the class sessions. Prerequisite: CM100A

Music & Worship (CM 215)

Credits:3

A study of the elements, history and development of music in the Church with emphasis on the Black Church. The course will examine traditional and contemporary worship styles and prepare ministers and music directors to lead diverse worship services. This course will also examine the process for hiring church musicians and purchasing instruments for the church. We will also discuss and explore common problems in the administration of a church music ministry.

AME Polity and Practice (CM 220)

Credits:3

This study of the polity and practice of the African Methodist Episcopal church prepares the student for informed and effective leadership at the local and connectional level. Prerequisite: CM100A

Worship & Liturgy (CM 233)

Credits:3

Worship is the signal activity of corporate meaningful activity in the church. The corporate gathering of the cultus-praise and worship of God - both directs the congregation's attention toward the Person with Whom we have to do and the persons we are called to be. In addition, worship provides a theological lens through which the world is interpreted by the people of God. Essential to ministerial performance, leadership in worship requires serious reflection and study concerning the true meaning of worship, theological underpinnings of liturgical expression, appropriate knowledge of liturgical traditions and the person and work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the worship leader. This course seeks to provide an introduction to each of these dimensions of liturgical leadership. Specific attention will be given to understanding the role of music in corporate worship, and developing a critique of postmodern influences in contemporary Christian music. Prerequisite: CM100A

Pastoral Care and Counseling (CM 240)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course to Pastoral Counseling. The student will become familiar with the broad scope of pastoral counseling: what it is; how the pastoral/ministerial identity affects its practice; how it is practiced; and the pastoral counselor's responsibilities. The course will acquaint the student with the skills necessary for the 20th century parishioner seeking counseling. It will explore several areas in which ministers/pastors are most frequently involved and assist students to develop their own particular style of counseling. Prerequisite: CM100A

HIV/AIDS: What Effective Clergy Must Know (CM 243)

Credits:3

This intensive course provides a foundation to understand and effectively address HIV/AIDS. A clear and unique science-based reframing of HIV/AIDS as "a fragile virus and a preventable infection" provides faith leaders a working knowledge of virus transmission, the disease process, how to live with HIV infection, and strategies for effective local efforts to help reverse the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Attendees participate in active learning for eye-opening insights on socioeconomic issues and practical steps to establish effective ministries for HIV/AIDS and other health disparities. They come away with a deeper understanding of the depth of issues and the call to action now.

Eco-Justice & the Christian Faith (CM 250)

Credits:3

This course will lead students into an encounter with various voices from the Christian tradition as well as selected voices outside the tradition that are wrestling constructively with the current interlinked crises of nature and culture. This course will explore contemporary work in the eco-justice theology and the sustainability movement. Questions concerning the place and role of human beings within creation, understandings of God, and the struggle for nurturing sustainable and just communities will be considered. The emphasis will be upon constructive theological and ethical reflection upon the global problem of environmental degradation and injustice.

Introduction to the Sociology of Religion (CM 260)

Credits:3

This course will introduce the student to some of the critical thinkers, both classical and contemporary, in the field of Sociology of Religion. We will come to a working definition of Sociology of Religion and look at its relation to theology. The student will also be introduced to methods of research in the field and will be required to do a research project. Prerequisite: CM100A

Conflict Management (CM 261)

Credits:3

This course focuses on identifying potential situations that can cause conflict, the collateral damage of conflict, types of conflict, building both health support systems and strategies to prevent abuse, and strengthening God's gift of spiritual discernment. Prerequisite: CM100A

Resolution of Disputes (CM 262)

Credits:3

This course involves an in-depth discussion of the various methodologies for mediating disputes and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: CM100A

Church Administration (CM 275)

Credits:3

This course will help prepare future pastors and other church leaders for the ministry of church administration, particularly in the African American Church utilizing the governing framework of the local African Methodist Episcopal Church. Students from other faith communities will be assisted and encouraged to identify and relate management and administrative principles to their particular context.

Rural and Small Church Ministry (CM 280)

Credits:3

This course will explore the small churches which are prevalent and persistent in American religion. Over one-half of all Protestant congregations worship with fewer than 75 people on a Sunday, and about two-thirds worship with fewer than 100. Programmatic and bureaucratic norms are often in conflict with local folkways in small churches, putting assigned leaders in difficult situations. Church leaders called and sent to particular communities have the challenge of learning the stories of those places, dealing with changes, and finding ways to tell the story of the gospel in, with and under the stories of people and place.

Senior Seminar I (CM 301A)

Credits:4

This class has a two-fold purpose: 1) to aid in the completion of the requirements for the M.Div. program and preparation for writing the Senior Thesis in particular; and 2) to deal with vocational goals and concerns which require additional support after graduating from the M.Div. program. Prerequisites: Senior status AND CM100A

Senior Seminar II (CM 301B)

Credits:4

Continuing the class has a two-fold purpose: 1) to aid in the completion of the requirements for the M.Div. program and preparation for writing the Senior Thesis in particular; and 2) to deal with vocational goals and concerns which require additional support after graduating from the M.Div. program. Prerequisites: CM301A, Senior status

Ministerial Sexual Ethics (CM 303)

Credits:3

This course addresses the matter of Clergy Misconduct. Sexual abuse in the ministerial relationship can become a serious dilemma within the congregation. Persons studying for entry into various ministries are challenged to examine the issues pertaining to clergy sexual misconduct, to examine their own values and to begin to develop their own policies for use with a potential congregation.

Transformational Leadership (CM 350)

Credits:3

This course is designed to uniquely challenge students' thinking about leadership and administration in the church. Students will be afforded the opportunity to hear and interact with scholars whose work has contributed greatly to elements of church life. The course will provide students opportunities to examine various aspects of literature pertaining to leadership and students will engage in discussions to clarify their own positions pertaining to the concepts that undergird leadership and administration in the 21st century church.

Directed Study (CM 370)

Credits:3

An opportunity for middler and senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue, or concern more fully. The student shall approach a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that will fulfill the agreed upon requirements for the conclusion of the study. Prerequisites: Faculty approval and CM100A

Introduction to Theological Research and Writing I (CM 400A)

Credits:3

This course offers a detailed, hands-on overview of the academic writing process, focused on effective methods for locating authoritative sources on selected topics; summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting material from sources into student papers while avoiding plagiarism; appropriately acknowledge authorship of material from other sources; review of grammar to include the mechanics involved in academic writing; and in general, comforting to prevailing standards of acceptability for written work submitted for publication, presentation at academic meetings or fulfillment of course credit and graduation requirements.

Introduction to Theological Research and Writing II (CM 400B)

Credits:3

This course offers a detailed, hands-on overview of the academic writing process, focused on effective methods for locating authoritative sources on selected topics; summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting material from sources into student papers while avoiding plagiarism; appropriately acknowledge authorship of material from other sources; review of grammar to include the mechanics involved in academic writing; and in general, comforting to prevailing standards of acceptability for written work submitted for publication, presentation at academic meetings or fulfillment of course credit and graduation requirements.

Supervised Ministry I (CM 401A)

Credits:2

This experience is based on an action - reflection model. Students are placed in the ministry context to perform a ministry. A supervisory conversation occurs between the student and the supervisor in the ministry context on a regular basis. Students are required to bring critical incidents from their ministry experience for reflection. Discussion of other topics related to practical ministry also occurs.

Supervised Ministry II (CM 401B)

Credits:2

This experience is based on an action - reflection model. Students are placed in the ministry context to perform a ministry. A supervisory conversation occurs between the student and the supervisor in the ministry context on a regular basis. Students are required to bring critical incidents from their ministry experience for reflection. Discussion of other topics related to practical ministry also occurs.

Pulpit Communication I (CM 402)

Credits:3

Study of fundamental principles of sermon construction and delivery, involving practical demonstrations of these principles by each student.

Spiritual Formation (CM 450)

Credits:3

This course is designed to engage participants in an exploration and expansion of their inner spiritual life utilizing the spiritual disciplines. Personal transformation is an internal process that occurs as the individual allows God access to the whole of one’s being and life. The course combines: 1) Personal encounter with God; 2) Keeping a spiritual journal as a record of the activity of God in one’s life; 3) Corporate sharing of one’s experience with God; 4) Select a book from the bibliography that is relevant to one’s spiritual development and formation. 5) Write a 5-page paper on the book and one’s interaction with it. Biblical and theological reflection on key issues that arise in the life of one who seriously engages in the spiritual disciplines.

Ministry Formation I (CM 480)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students explore the various ways in which pastors and church leaders can access multiple sources of capital to fuel church growth and community revitalization. Students will examine biblical and other paradigms, strategies and practical applications to address the many issues facing local congregations primarily from an African- American perspective.

Pulpit Communication II (CM 502)

Credits:3

The enhancement of preaching skills in a structured learning situation is the purpose of this course. The student will be aided in the development of a mature pulpit presence and style.

Introduction to Christian Education (CM 510)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce the student to the Christian educational task of the Church. It includes an examination of the biblical, theological, and social foundations pertinent to the ministry of Christian Education. Discussions of topics such as the basic components of the Christian education program, methodologies and techniques for implementation, curriculum selection and development, as well as program evaluation, characterize the class sessions.

AME Polity and Practice (CM 520)

Credits:3

Required for AME only. This study of the polity and practice of the African Methodist Episcopal church prepares the student for informed and effective leadership at the local and connectional level.

Ministry Formation II (CM 530)

Credits:3

This course will equip students to bridge the gap between spiritual formation and community transformation in their ministry context by identifying alternative sources of capital for ministry (FISH) and studying strategies and best practices for Christian Community Development.

Worship and Liturgy (CM 533)

Credits:3

Worship is the signal activity of corporate meaningful activity in the church. The corporate gathering of the cultus-praise and worship of God-both directs the congregation’s attention toward the Person with Whom we have to do and the persons we are called to be. In addition, worship provides a theological lens through which the world is interpreted by the people of God. Essential to ministerial performance, leadership in worship requires serious reflection and study concerning the true meaning of worship, theological underpinnings of liturgical expression, appropriate knowledge of liturgical traditions and the person and work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the worship leader. This course seeks to provide an introduction to each of these dimensions of liturgical leadership. Specific attention is given to understanding the role of music in corporate worship, and developing a critique of postmodern influences in contemporary Christian music.

Pastoral Care and Counseling (CM 540)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course to Pastoral Counseling. The student becomes familiar with the broad scope of pastoral counseling: what it is, how the pastoral/ ministerial identity affects its practice, how it is practiced and the pastoral counselor’s responsibilities. The course acquaints the student with the skills necessary for the 20th century parishioner seeking counseling. It explores several areas in which ministers/pastors are most frequently involved and assists students to develop their own particular style of counseling.

Health Care: What Effective Clergy Should Know (CM 544)

Credits:3

This course provides a foundation to understand and effectively address health care issues. Students participate in active learning for eye-opening insights on socioeconomic issues and practical steps to establish effective ministries for health care. They come away with a deeper understanding of the depth of issues and the call to action now.

Eco-Justice and the Christian Faith (CM 550)

Credits:3

This course explores contemporary work in eco- justice theology, eco-feminism, Native American and third world scholarship, and the sustainability movement. Questions concerning the place and role of human beings within creation, understandings of God and Christ, economic globalization, conflicting uses of public lands, environmental racism, classism and sexism, and the struggle for nurturing sustainable and just communities are considered. The emphasis is upon constructive theological and ethical reflection upon the global problematic of environmental degradation and injustice.

Introduction to Sociology of Religion (CM 560)

Credits:3

This course introduces the student to some of the critical thinkers, both classical and contemporary, in the field of Sociology of Religion. We come to a working definition of Sociology of Religion and look at its relation to theology. The student is introduced to methods of research in the field and is required to do a research project.

The Church in its Urban Environment (CM 570)

Credits:3

This course looks at the urban environment as a context for ministry. A general overview of the origin of the city and the city in history is presented. A theology and mission for the city will be examined as the basis for ministry in the city. Urban ministry sites are visited at urban centers in the area (Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield). Several approaches to urban ministry are discussed.

Church Administration (CM 575)

Credits:3

This course will help prepare future pastors and other church leaders for the ministry of church administration, particularly in the African American Church utilizing the governing framework of the local African Methodist Episcopal Church. Students from other faith communities will be assisted and encouraged to identify and relate management and administrative principles to their particular context.

Rural and Small Church Ministry (CM 580)

Credits:3

This course will explore the small churches which are prevalent and persistent in American religion. Over one-half of all Protestant congregations worship with fewer than 75 people on a Sunday, and about two- thirds worship with fewer than 100. Programmatic and bureaucratic norms are often in conflict with local folkways in small churches, putting assigned leaders in difficult situations. Church leaders called and sent to particular communities have the challenge of learning the stories of those places, dealing with changes, and finding ways to tell the story of the gospel in, with and under the stories of people and place.

Senior Seminar I (CM 601A)

Credits:3

This class has a two-fold purpose: 1) to aid in the completion of the requirements for the M.Div. program and preparation for writing the Senior Thesis in particular; and 2) to deal with vocational goals and concerns that require additional support after graduating from the M.Div. program.

Senior Seminar II (CM 601B)

Credits:3

This class has a two-fold purpose: 1) to aid in the completion of the requirements for the M.Div. program and preparation for writing the Senior Thesis in particular; and 2) to deal with vocational goals and concerns that require additional support after graduating from the M.Div. program.

Ministerial Sexual Ethics (CM 603)

Credits:3

This course addresses the matter of clergy misconduct. Sexual abuse in the ministerial relationship can become a serious dilemma within the congregation. Persons studying for entry into various ministries are challenged to examine the issues pertaining to clergy sexual misconduct, to examine their own values and to begin to develop their own policies for use with a potential congregation.

Transformational Leadership (CM 650)

Credits:3

This course is designed to uniquely challenge students’ thinking about leadership and administration in the church. Students are afforded the opportunity to hear and interact with scholars whose work has contributed greatly to elements of church life. The course provides students opportunities to examine various aspects of literature pertaining to leadership and students engage in discussions to clarify their own positions pertaining to the concepts that undergird leadership and administration in the 21st century church.

Directed Studies (CM 670)

Credits:3

Prerequisites: Faculty approval. An opportunity for Middler and Senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue or concern more fully. The student approaches a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that fulfills the agreed-upon requirements for the conclusion of the study.

Ministerial Studies: Special Topics (CM 699)

Credits:3

This course offers various topics in Ministerial Studies. Each section will have a unique description for the specific class being offered.

Practical Ministry Elective (CM ELEC)

Credits:3

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)

Credits:3

Clinical Pastoral Education II (CPE II)

Credits:3

Advance Preparation for Ministry (DMN 710)

Credits:5

Upon entering the program, a participant attends Intensive Seminar I on research tools for analysis of the context in which the doctoral work will be done. Included in the seminar are elements of understanding how one's own strengths, weaknesses and interests intersect with that setting. Following the seminar, students write a Semester I papers on "The Context and The Participant." The results of these papers are explored with colleagues and advisors in the process of conceiving possibilities for a project that will strengthen both the student and the context of ministry.

Problem Analysis in the Practice of Ministry (DMN 720)

Credits:5

Students entering their second semester of the program will begin to develop their expertise in the subject matter of the focus group as it relates to their particular ministry context. Students will also sharpen their understanding of the ministry focus as it relates to the Focus Group Subject Matter. In the case of Transformational Church Leadership, students will become familiar with the various nuances of leadership issues within their ministry context. Students will engage in literature reviews and develop a sense of the state of the art in the ministry focus and the subject area. Students will also explore how problems within the subject matter (Transformational Church Leadership) are manifested within their own as well as other ministry context. This intensive will serve as a focus group for the subject matter and this topic will be thoroughly explored.

Foundations for the Practice of Ministry (DMN 730)

Credits:5

This course prepares doctoral students to appropriate a biblical, historical, and a theological foundation for their problem area. This foundation is developed with persons in the ministry context and discussed with colleagues and advisors. At the course’s completion, doctoral students will be ready to prepare a preliminary project proposal which will be used for Candidacy Review. This core course module will help the program participants with: 1) Gaining a biblical understanding of the problem area 2) Gaining a historical understanding of the problem area 3) Gaining a theological understanding of the problem area

Research Design (DMN 740)

Credits:5

Students entering their fourth semester of the program will begin to develop their expertise in developing research methods particular to their subject matter and ministry context. This course will introduce students to the ways in which choices of methodology are closely linked to broader theoretical and conceptual issues. Students will be provided with a critical understanding of the philosophical commitments and behavioral assumptions in research methodology enabling them to consider the appropriateness of different methodologies and types of evidence to examine problems in their ministry context. Students will gain an understanding of a variety of research methods, including focus group research, survey research, interviewing, participant observation, case studies, comparative analysis, and the use of documentary and primary sources.

Field Research in Ministry (DMN 750)

Credits:8

This course will assist students in the completion of the field research component of their projects. Students will engage in project monitoring, data collection and analysis as a part of preparing their final documents. Students develop technical skills in the art of ministry while they reflect theologically on what they are learning and experiencing while experiencing intellectual, ministerial, and personal growth. Through field research, students become reflective practitioners integrating theoretical perspectives with the practical experience they gain in the context of their ministry settings.

Introduction to Christian Ethics (ETH 330)

Credits:3

Christian History in Context I (HS 110)

Credits:3

This course will examine the doctrines, belief systems, and people who continually reshaped the Christian message, which was passed from one generation to the next. The focus of this class will be from the age of the Apostolic Fathers to the Middle Ages.

Christian History in Context II (HS 120)

Credits:3

This course will continue to examine the doctrines, belief systems and people who continually reshaped the Christian message which was passed from one generation to the next. The focus of the class will be from the late Middle Ages to the African-American experience of the 20th century.

AME Church History (HS 221)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical development of the A.M.E. Church and the thought of its leadership. This is done in the context of an evaluation of its role in African American history. Prerequisites: HS120

Diff. Expressions of American Christianity (HS 230)

Credits:3

An introduction to the major persons and ideas that have helped shape the content and direction of various denominations and religious groups in America. Attention is given to the ways in which various theological notions interfaced with and often helped shape the social, political, economic, and racial views and values of the nation from the Colonial period to the present. Prerequisite: HS120

Gender & Sex (HS 240)

Credits:3

This course will examine Christian attitudes toward gender and sexualilty from the first century to the fifth century. We will be looking at the Old Testament, New Testament, and the Church Fathers. We will also be reading the writings of modern scholars who have commented on these works. We will attempt to discover if and how writings from the early church shaped modern Christian writer's understandings of gendeer and sexuality. Prerequisites: HS110

Early African Christianity (HS 250)

Credits:3

This course will examine early North African Christian theology from its beginnings through the time of Augustine. We will look at the different theological climate that existed in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Northwestern Africa. We will focus on the special place that Alexandrian school of interpretation played in the formation of early exegetical studies. We will also look at the influences on North African Christian theology and the influences of North African theology on its contemporary world and later theological developments. Prerequisite: HS110

Christianity and Judaism (HS 260)

Credits:3

This course will examine anti-Semitism within the Christian community from the New Testament times through the Holocaust. We will explore how this has been mainfested in literature, theology, laws, art, and drama. We will look at primary documents as well as later historiography. We will see how anti-Semitism has changed within Christianity. The course raises issues of racial and theological bigotry. Prerequisite: HS110 and HS120

Directed Study (HS 370)

Credits:3

An opportunity for middler and senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue, or concern more fully. The student shall approach a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that will fulfill the agreed upon requirements for the conclusion of the study. Prerequisites: Faculty approval

African American Christianity (HS 380)

Credits:3

This course is designed to explore the people and events which shaped the African American religious experience and how the African American church helped shape the political, economic and cultural America. We will examine the African American church's response to issues such as slavery, the anti-slavery movement, the civil war, the reconstruction era, the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, liberation theology, and the current ecumenical movement. We will look at both primary sources and the writings of African American scholars and historians who have written about the involvement of the Black church in these areas. Prerequisite: HS120

Religious and Social Ferment in the 16th Century (HS 390)

Credits:3

This course focuses on current issues facing Reformation historians and theologians. Intellectual, economic, political and religious aspects of the age are examined. By incorporating "secular" issues into the study, an understanding of the forces at work that brought about an important age in the history of Europe is greatly improved. Prerequisites: HS110 and HS120.

Christian History in Context I (HS 410)

Credits:3

This course examines the doctrines, belief systems, and people who continually reshaped the Christian message, which was passed from one generation to the next. The focus of this class is from the age of the Apostolic Fathers to the Middle Ages.

Christian History in Context II (HS 420)

Credits:3

This course continues to examine the doctrines, belief systems, and people who continually reshaped the Christian message, which was passed from one generation to the next. The focus of the class is from the late Middle Ages to the African-American experience of the 20th century.

AME Church History (HS 521)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical development of the A.M.E. Church and the thought of its leadership. This is done in the context of an evaluation of its role in African American history.

Different Expressions of American Christianity (HS 530)

Credits:3

An introduction to the major persons and ideas that have helped shape the content and direction of various denominations and religious groups in America. Attention is given to the ways in which various theological notions interfaced with and often helped shape the social, political, economic, and racial views and values of the nation from the Colonial period to the present.

Gender and Sex: Issues in the Ancient Church (HS 540)

Credits:3

This course examines early Christian attitudes toward gender and sexuality from the first to the fifth century, particularly through the lens of Christian virginity. It examines the Hebrew Scriptures (Tanakh), New Testament, and the Church Fathers. Consideration is given to the writings of modern scholarship. The attempt is made to discover if and how writings from the early church shaped modern Christian understandings of gender and sexuality.

Early North African Christianity (HS 550)

Credits:3

This course examines early North African Christian theology from its beginnings through the time of Augustine. The different theological climates that existed in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Northwestern Africa are studied. Focus on the special place that the Alexandrian school of interpretation played in the formation of early exegetical studies is considered. What influenced North African Christian theology and the influences it had on its world and later theological developments are scrutinized.

Judaism and Christianity: From Conflict to Conversation (HS 560)

Credits:3

This course examines anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism in the Christian community from the first century through the fifth century. It explores how this was manifested in literature, i.e., theology, laws, art, and drama. It looks at primary documents as well as later historiography. The course raises issues of racial and theological bigotry.

Directed Studies (HS 670)

Credits:3

Prerequisites: Faculty approval. An opportunity for Middler and Senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue or concern more fully. The student approaches a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that fulfills the agreed-upon requirements for the conclusion of the study.

African American Christianity (HS 680)

Credits:3

This course is designed to explore the people and events which shaped the African American religious experience and how the African American church helped shape the political, economic and cultural America. We will examine the African American church’s response to issues such as slavery, the anti- slavery movement, the civil war, the reconstruction era, the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, liberation theology, and the current ecumenical movement. We will look at both primary sources and the writings of African American scholars and historians who have written about the involvement of the Black church in these areas.

Religious and Social Ferment in the 16th Century (HS 690)

Credits:3

This course focuses on current issues facing Reformation historians and theologians. Intellectual, economic, political and religious aspects of the age are examined. By incorporating “secular” issues into the study, an understanding of the forces at work that brought about an important age in the history of Europe is greatly improved.

Historical Studies: Special Topics II (HS 698)

Credits:3

Historical Studies: Special Topics (HS 699)

Credits:3

This course offers various topics in Historical Studies. Each section will have a unique description for the specific class being offered.

History Elective (HS ELEC)

Credits:3

Special Topics (HS/BS 699)

Credits:3

Foundations in Leadership (LDR 701)

Credits:3

This course will briefly introduce students to aspects of leadership including Servant Leadership, Charismatic Leadership, Visionary Leadership, Adaptive Leadership, Situational Leadership, and Transformational Leadership. The course will explore the various aspects of leadership within the African American church in the Information Age. Students will be able to examine their own personal leadership characteristics as well as that of their ministry context. The role of technology and its impact on decisions will be explored from a local and global perspective. This course will place emphasis on transformative learning as a tool for leadership development.

Transformational Leadership (LDR 702)

Credits:3

This course is designed to engage students in understanding, implementing, and evaluating transformational leadership practices based on various theories, models, and approaches for achieving organizational transformation. Students will become skilled facilitators of the transformational leadership process by initiating, implementing, sustaining, and evaluating transformation/change efforts. Students will build a solid foundation through the integration of theory and practice in order to implement a planned change process in their ministry context. By the end of this course, students will have developed a well-rounded understanding of transformational leadership concepts for use in their own contexts of ministry.

Church Leadership and Community Organizing (LDR 703)

Credits:3

This course will explore how the church can be a change agent under pervasive economic and social justice issues that cripple urban and rural churches and their communities. Community organizing principles for assessing and interpreting human behavior for the purpose of preaching, worshipping, teaching, service, and discipleship are discussed in light of the marginalized and poor in the ministry context. Doctoral students learn the necessary concepts and tools to guide their actions and inform their ministry. Models and best practices for ministry will be discussed in light of social, cultural, political, and economical realities impacting church leadership. This course will assist doctoral students in developing their leadership capacity for bringing people together to work for change and increase their abilities in power analysis and effective strategizing for effective community organizing.

Visionary Leadership (LDR 704)

Credits:3

Students will examine Visionary Leadership from the perspective of engaging the best of leadership literature in dialogue with theological and biblical themes. Students will learn key elements of effective leadership grounded in working with those in their context of ministry to shape and fulfill a common vision discerned to be God’s next faithful step for them. A variety of contexts are considered using a variety of learning methods.

Adaptive Leadership for a Changing Church and Community (LDR 705)

Credits:3

Adaptive Leadership is a practical leadership framework developed by Ron Heifetz and Marty Linsky at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. This course applies theory to the practice of leadership within societies and organizations facing the adaptive challenges of a changing world. It clarifies the relationship among key concepts -- leadership, management, authority, power, influence, followership, citizenship - to provide a coherent, practical foundation. The course develops: a) diagnostic tools for analyzing the systemic dynamics of change in social systems, and b) strategies of action to mobilize collective attention and problem-solving responsibility. These tools include strategies to generate social learning and innovation; orchestrate multi-party conflict; lead through crisis; gain, use, and negotiate with authority; and build a culture of long-term adaptability. Through these frameworks and tools, students discover options for practicing leadership with and without authority, from any position in an organization or society.

Women and Men Working Together in Pursuit of Excellence in Church Leadership (LDR 706)

Credits:3

This course is designed to examine the biblical, theological, and historical aspects of women in church leadership. Students will evaluate the leadership practices of women in church leadership based on various theories, approaches, and models of leadership. In particular, students will examine these examples of leadership in light of current scholarship and emerging trends in the discipline. This course integrates relevant issues on various sides of the discussion of women leaders in church history. By the end of this course, students will have developed a theologically sound understanding of historical and contemporary issues related to women’s leadership in the church.

Immunity to Change (LDR 707)

Credits:3

Students will explore challenges and collective mind-sets present in their ministry context which create a natural but powerful immunity to change. This course will reveal how this mechanism impedes and holds congregations back. Students will be given the keys to unlock potential latent in their ministry context in order to move forward. This course will pinpoint and uproot student’s immunities to change so that they can move their congregations forward.

Gender Issues in Leadership (LDR 708)

Credits:3

Students will examine the experiences of men and women leaders by exploring how women have gained more access to powerful leadership positions and why men continue to have far more access to leadership than women. The course will present students with research from a variety of disciplines, including social psychology, sociology, economics, political science, management and organizational science.

Organizational Change (LDR 709)

Credits:3

This course provides students with a theoretical knowledge base relevant to taking an Adaptive Leadership approach to problems in their ministry context. The course content focuses on leadership and the implementation of organizational change to include adaptation, growth, renewal, transformation, global integration, and cultural change. Students will be able to examine their own personal leadership characteristics as well as that of their ministry context with the goal of impacting praxis through the application of gained theoretical knowledge. The role of organizational technology in a rapidly changing environment will be explored from a local and global perspective.

Prophetic Preaching Through a Male/Female Hermeneutic (LDR 710)

Credits:3

This course explores hermeneutical dialogue regarding how the task of prophetic preaching today might be revived, reframed, and redefined in light of the female and male genders. Students summarize four contemporary approaches to prophetic preaching set forth by female and male homiletical scholars in their respective contexts and address questions related to themes and emphases in the work of these homileticians with the goal of continuing to challenge and reframe preaching practices today. In this course, students reflect upon comparisons between female and male hermeneutical perspectives in order to deepen and expand his or her understanding of prophetic preaching and its role in church and society.

Catalyzing Sustainable Change (LDR 711)

Credits:3

This course increases students’ ability to act as agents for sustainable change within their ministry contexts. The course explores what adaptive change management for sustainability is, including the competencies, skills, knowledge and strategies needed in a constantly changing ministry environment. As a part of catalyzing change, the personal, organizational, and technical dimensions of change are addressed for the purpose of achieving sustainability in practice.

Principles of Liberation Theology (LTS 701)

Credits:3

This course explores several of the various forms of liberation theology that emerged across the globe starting in the second half of the 20th century. The course will give sustained attention to liberation theologies in Africa and Latin America and in particular, their relationship to revolutionary political struggles in those contexts. Coming out of very different political, economic, and cultural contexts and coming to very different conclusions, all the theologians studied are united in their conviction that the gospel is best understood as a radical message of liberation and that the gospel must be claimed by the poor and oppressed over against those who use Christianity as a tool of domination and imperialism. In the spirit of this second point, the course is focused mostly on two movements that began nearly simultaneously and are regarded as the most important roots of liberation theology: Latin American liberation theology and black theology in the United States. We will also give attention to a variety of texts that build on that legacy from different social and geographical locations, encompassing feminist, womanist, African, and Korean perspectives.

Preaching Liberation Theology (LTS 702)

Credits:3

Preaching Liberation will explore the theory and hermeneutics that informs liberation theology with particular interest towards preaching. The course is designed to develop a process for preaching with emphasis on liberation theology for the novice or seasoned preacher. Students will have an opportunity to preach a Liberation Theology sermon in class. The premise of the course is that as we listen for liberation in sacred text and the lived experience we learn the language of liberation and can therefore preach it with authenticity and transformative power.

Praxis of Liberation Theology (LTS 703)

Credits:3

This course examines the hermeneutics of non-traditional disciplines of post-graduate theological education. Particular attention is given to: • Black Youth and Intergenerational relations; • education, class and poverty; • gender, sexual orientation and race; • globalism, immigration, and diasporan communities; • health Care, HIV/AIDS, poverty; and • mass incarceration, capital punishment, and the criminal justice system. The course will give sustained attention to the ongoing conversation of scholars working within practical theology including the voices of pastors of black congregations and para-church leaders who serve the communities of faith which daily confront the challenges this work addresses youth and intergenerational divides, education and poverty, gender and sexuality, globalism, health care, and incarceration and the justice system. Coming out of very different political, economic, and cultural contexts and coming to very different conclusions, all the theologians studied are united in their conviction that the gospel is best understood as a radical message of liberation and that the gospel must be claimed by the poor and oppressed over against those who use Christianity as a tool of domination and imperialism. This course will require doctoral students to embody their own methodological call beginning with the issues of the black church as well as its resources and practices in order to impact the community from which it emerged.

The Promise of Liberation Theology (LTS 704)

Credits:3

This course will take three interrelated theological themes as its guides: power, suffering, and liberation. Taking its cues from the tradition of liberation theology, this course will read biblical stories of power, suffering, and liberation dialectically with recent and contemporary issues of political, economic, social, and global importance. The point here is not to examine theological abstractions from a systematic or theoretical perspective, but rather to examine lived experience in the real world through a theological lens. In this course, students will examine some of the new voices that are contributing to the theological discourse and the theologies that are emerging as a result. Some of the theologies that may be studied in this course include ecumenical, Latin American liberation, Asian, African, black and feminist. Attention will also be given to the trends in theological method that complement the various contextual theologies all of which apply their different perspectives to address classic theological questions.

The Person of the Pastor (PPC 701)

Credits:3

Introduction to Systematic Theology (TRE 400)

Credits:3

In order to achieve a basic understanding of the discipline of systematic theology, this course surveys the Western philosophical foundations of Christian theology from the Presocratics of early Greece through Immanuel Kant and the European Enlightenment. By examining the relationship between philosophical ideas and theological reflection, students develop the fundamental skills necessary for the analytical interpretation of theological texts and the constructive task of formulating a personal theological statement.

Introduction to Liberation Theology (TRE 405)

Credits:3

An examination of Christian theology as it finds contemporary expression in the liberation theologies of North America, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The birth of liberation theological movements in the latter part of the 20th century is viewed against the background of the Enlightenment and the emergence of orthodox, liberal and neo-orthodox theologies. Students have the opportunity to clarify their own theological stance by engaging theological perspectives that are radically different from their own.

The Ethos and Practices of Traditional African Religions (TRE 480)

Credits:3

Students will be exposed to religious traditions that are native to the African continent so that they might develop critical appreciation for what appropriately grounds an Africentric ethos and enabled to fashion tools and criteria for interpreting and applying values associated with this ethos.

Beyond Mono-Culturalism: Interreligious Insights (TRE 500)

Credits:3

In this course, students will explore crucial elements of the thought and practices/cultural expressions that are associated with major religious traditions that, with the Judeo-Christian tradition, influence most the world’s peoples. In the process, students will be nurtured in their capacity to think globally, to be self-critical, to pursue respectful understanding of those who are different and to be ecological in orientation.

Introduction to Christian Ethics (TRE 501)

Credits:3

An exploration of theory and method in Christian ethics emphasizing experience and reflection as elements of moral life.

The Ethics of "Informed Consent" (TRE 507)

Credits:3

A study of bio-medical ethics utilizing the account of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks as a case study illuminating the significance of “informed consent as a normative principle in public policy.”

African American Religious Experience (TRE 510)

Credits:3

This course focuses upon the development of the African American religious experience in the United States. Attention is given to the African heritage. The African American experience in Christianity, Islam and Judaism is explored. In each instance, concern is given to the efficacy of the experience for the adherents.

The Religious and Moral Meaning of Black Protest (TRE 515)

Credits:3

This course will explore theological, ethical and strategic aspects of the thought of selected African American theologians and protest leaders, with consideration of implications for contemporary issues facing African Americans.

Eccleisology: The Black Church in the North American Context (TRE 520)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the social, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped the theological understanding of “The Black Church” in the context of North America. Case studies of local congregations from within African American ecclesial traditions, along with evangelical and liberal Protestant traditions, is used to critically examine the theological role of church in society. The freedom and justice tradition of the African American church frame the dialogue with a variety of North American church traditions that view the church as an empowering agent of social resistance, cultural critique, and transformation. Attention is also given to developing ecclesiologies that are emerging from increasingly diverse church communities throughout North America.

The Ethics of Religious Freedom and Racial Equality in the US (TRE 522)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the First Amendment right to religious liberty and the history of its interpretation in decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court. Particular attention will be paid to implications for current issues in critiques of “separation of church and state” as the prevailing legal interpretation.

Christianity and Racism (TRE 530)

Credits:3

The emergence of racism as a modern phenomenon is explored. A Christian understanding of humankind is contrasted with a racist viewpoint. A survey of the cultures of various ethnic groups in the United States is used to promote an appreciation of racial diversity in this country.

Islam in the African American Religious Experience (TRE 535)

Credits:3

This course looks at Islam as one of the major monotheistic religions of the world, and African American adaptations in the United States. We do a brief survey of the founding and establishment of Islam as a major world religion. We do a survey of the various expressions of Islam among African Americans in the United States. We consider the Nation of Islam both as a religious movement and as an expression of Black nationalism.

Theological Method (TRE 540)

Credits:3

A critical study of the meaning and future of classical and contemporary theological method. The contribution, critique, and challenge of Liberation, Womanist, and Feminist theologies to each other and to Western theological methodology are examined. This approach to the study of theological method debates the assertion: “No one puts new wine into old wineskins.” Specific attention is given to how the recovery and use of non-traditional sources of God-talk (prayers, songs, story, etc.) are creating new theological paradigms. How traditional sources of theology (scripture, tradition, experience, and reason) are interpreted, through the lens of different cultures and contexts of oppression, is also explored. Students have the opportunity to advance constructive statements about new ways of doing theology in their context.

Ecological Theology (TRE 560)

Credits:3

Can the Christian tradition provide a rationale that will persuade human beings from destroying other species, their habitats and the grater biosphere of our planet? Widespread ecological degradation has prompted biblical scholars, systematic theologians and ethicists to explore ways of thinking about and acting more compatibly within the community of diverse beings that constitute Earth. This course has been designed to bring students into this ongoing dialogue by examining systematically some notions in Christian texts and discerning the extent to which they provide promising foundations for ecological theology.

The Theology and Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr (TRE 620)

Credits:3

This course considers both the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. Specific attention is given to understanding his sociopolitical context and his contribution as a theologian and ethicist. An examination is made of his writings and important interpretations of this thought.

The Theology of the Spirituals (TRE 630)

Credits:3

This study places the Spirituals at the center of African American theological consciousness as an invaluable resource for the contemporary construction of African American theologies. The origin, function, and theological content of the Spirituals is examined in relation to issues that are critical to the liberation of the African American community and the historical role and traditions of the Black church. Students are given an opportunity to develop resources and skills that permit advanced research in the theological interpretation of the Spirituals.

Introduction to Womanist and Feminist Theology (TRE 642)

Credits:3

This course explores the origins, development, and major themes of Black and Womanist theologies as contemporary theological movements that emerged in the United States in the late 20th century. The major focus of the course is a critical examination of the mutual critique and dialogue between Black and Womanist theologies. Specific attention is given to how the issues of gender, race, and class inform the tensions between and the construction of each theological perspective. Tensions within Black and Womanist theologies are also addressed along with the way they have engaged, challenged, and been challenged by various theological perspectives in the United States, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Students confront the question: What do both of these theologies have to say to each other about Christianity, culture, politics and social reality in today’s world?

Directed Studies (TRE 670)

Credits:3

Prerequisites: Faculty approval. An opportunity for Middler and Senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue or concern more fully. The student approaches a faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that fulfills the agreed-upon requirements for the conclusion of the study.

Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference (TRE 680)

Credits:3

Special Topics in Theology, Religion and Ethics (TRE 699)

Credits:3

Theology, Religion and Ethics Elective (TRE ELEC)

Credits:3

Introduction to Systematic Theology (TS 100)

Credits:3

In order to achieve a basic understanding of the discipline of systematic theology, this course will survey the Western philosophical foundations of Christian theology from the Presocratics of early Greece through Immanuel Kant and the European Enlightenment. By examining the relationship between philosophical ideas and theological reflection, students will develop the fundamental skills necessary for the analytical interpretation of theological texts and the constructive task of formulating a personal theological statement.

Introduction to Liberation Theologies (TS 105)

Credits:3

An examination of Christian theology as it finds contemporary expression in the liberation theologies of North America, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The birth of liberation theological movements in the latter part of the twentieth century will be viewed against the background of the Enlightenment and the emergence of orthodox, liberal, and neo-orthodox theologies. Students will have the opportunity to clarify their own theological stance by engaging theological perspectives that are radically different from their own.

Introduction to Christian Ethics (TS 201)

Credits:3

This course explores why and how people make decisions. Sociological, political and economic factors which influence decision making, critical issues and theological perspectives related to decision making and contemporary perspectives resulting from cultural change will be examined. Prerequisite: BS101 or BS103

The Ethics of "Informed Consent" (TS 207)

Credits:3

A study of bio-medical ethics utilizing the account of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks as a case study illuminating the significance of “informed consent as a normative principle in public policy.”

African American Religious Experience (TS 210)

Credits:3

This course focuses upon the development of the African American religious experience in the United States. Attention is given to the African heritage. The African American experience in Christianity, Islam and Judaism is explored. In each instance, concern is given to the efficacy of the experience for the adherents. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

The Religious and Moral Meanings of Black Protest (TS 215)

Credits:3

This course will explore theological, ethical and strategic aspects of the thought of selected African American theologians and protest leaders, with consideration of implications for contemporary issues facing African Americans. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Ecclesiology: The Black Church in N.A. Context (TS 220)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the social, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped the theological understanding of “The Black Church” in the context of North America. Case studies of local congregations from within African-American ecclesial traditions along with evangelical and liberal Protestant traditions will be used to critically examine the theological role of church in society. The freedom and justice tradition of the African-American church will frame the dialogue with a variety of North American church traditions that view the church as an empowering agent of social resistance, cultural critique, and transformation. Attention will also be given to present developing ecclesiologies that are emerging from increasingly diverse church communities throughout North America. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Church and State in the Twenty-First Century (TS 222)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the First Amendment right to religious liberty and the history of its interpretation in decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court. Particular attention will be paid to implications for current issues in critiques of “separation of church and state” as the prevailing legal interpretation.

Christianity and Racism (TS 230)

Credits:3

The emergence of racism as a modern phenomenon is explored. A Christian understanding of humankind is contrasted with a racist viewpoint. A survey of the cultures of various ethnic groups in the United States is used to promote an appreciation of racial diversity in this country. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Islam in the African Am. Religious Experience (TS 235)

Credits:3

This course will look at Islam as one of the major monotheistic religions of the world, and African American adaptations in the United States. We will do a brief survey of the founding and establishment of Islam as a major world religion. We will do a survey of the various expressions of Islam among African Americans in the United States. We will consider the Nation of Islam both as a religious movement and as an expression of Black nationalism. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Theological Method (TS 240)

Credits:3

A critical study of the meaning and future of classical and contemporary theological method. The contribution, critique, and challenge of Liberation, Womanist, and Feminist theologies to each other and to Western theological methodology will be examined. This approach to the study of theological method will debate the assertion: "No one puts new wine into old wineskins." Specific attention will be given to how the recovery and use of non-traditional sources of God-talk (prayers, songs, story, etc.) are creating new theological paradigms. How traditional sources of theology (scripture, tradition, experience, etc.) are interpreted, through the lens of different cultures and contexts of oppression, will also be explored. Students will have the opportunity to advance constructive statements about new ways of doing theology in their context. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Ecological Theology (TS 260)

Credits:3

Can the Christian tradition provide a rationale that will persuade human beings from destroying other species, their habitats and the grater biosphere of our planet? Widespread ecological degradation has prompted biblical scholars, systematic theologians and ethicists to explore ways of thinking about and acting more compatibly within the community of diverse beings which constitute Earth. This course has been designed to bring students into this ongoing dialogue by examining systematically some notions in Christian texts and discerning the extent to which they provide promising foundations for ecological theology. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Theology and Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (TS 320)

Credits:3

This course will consider both the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. Specific attention will be given to understanding his sociopolitical context and his contribution as a theologian and ethicist. An examination will be made of his writings and important interpretations of this thought. Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Race Crime and Justice (TS 336)

Credits:3

The course is designed to provide scholarly and experiential exposure to the issues presented by the scale of incarceration in the United States today. Participants will gain an understanding of the politics of crime policy, the relationship between incarceration and crime, the racial dynamics of the criminal justice system, and alternatives to incarceration. The course will also facilitate interaction with actors in the justice system in the Washington, D.C. area, which may include courtwatching and a tour of the DC Jail, and discussions with leaders in corrections, jail ministry, re-entry planning, and advocacy.

Intro to Womanist & Feminist Theology (TS 342)

Credits:3

This course will explore the origins, development, and major themes of Black and Womanist theologies as contemporary theological movements that emerged in the United States in the late 20th century. The major focus of the course will be a critical examination of the mutual critique and dialogue between Black and Womanist theologies. Specific attention will be given to how the issues of gender, race, and class inform the tensions between and the construction of each theological perspective. Tensions within Black and Womanist theologies will also be addressed along with the way they have engaged, challenged and been challenged by various theological perspectives in the United States, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Students will confront the question: What do both of these theologies have to say to each other about Christianity, culture, politics and social reality in today's world? Prerequisite: TS100 or TS105

Directed Study (TS 370)

Credits:2

An opportunity for Middler and Senior students to explore a question, challenge, issue or concern more fully. The student approaches a Faculty member in the preferred area of study to request guidance and oversight, as well as approval and direction in the pursuit of research to prepare an appropriate project or paper that will fulfill the agreed-upon requirements for the conclusion of the study. Prerequisite: Faculty approval

Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference (TS 380)

Credits:3

A framework of and grounding in theology and ethics is essential to ministry and church administration. Yet, so often theology and ethics are seen as peripheral to the Word and work of the African-American Church. Given the challenges facing the world at large, and the U.S. in particular, pastors, as teachers and prophets, must make critical theological reflection the underpinning for the trinity of homiletics/preaching; liturgy/music; and administration/ministries. This course and conference are designed to strengthen the participants’ holistic understanding of their call to ministry and the calls of their congregations as a call from God upon the mind, body and soul of a people.

Theological Studies: Special topics (TS 698)

Credits:3

This course offers various topics in Theological Studies. Each section will have a unique description for the specific class being offered.

Theological Studies: Special Topics (TS 699)

Credits:3

This course offers various topics in Theological Studies. Each section will have a unique description for the specific class being offered.

Theological Studies Elective (TS ELEC)

Credits:3